Apr 282011
 

Quite a bit has happened since I wrote my last post here.  I’ve moved from Canberra up to Cooranbong, and am still trying to unpack the last of the boxes.  This move was the cause for quite a serious outage of this website, as my webserver needed to be packed and transported and unpacked.  Oh, and having the internet connected to our new home took far longer than anyone expected.

Another new thing is my current position as a full-time lecturer in physics.  I have returned to Avondale College of Higher Education where I did my undergraduate degree, this time to teach for a year.  I’m enjoying lecturing, and it is excellent professional experience to have.

Finally, and most dramatically, we have a new member in our family.  Two weeks ago Leighton Jeffrey Rogers was born, and he is currently managing to keep his parents thoroughly occupied.

Me holding baby Leighton

New baby Leighton

Jul 312010
 

As well as the typical photos and video, I also recorded gps traces of our recumbent trike cycle adventure.  Sorting these trip records has been takiing up most of my spare time since arriving back home, and I now only have the video to go.  That will be a significantly longer job, I suspect.

But the exciting thing about having gps traces put together is that I can put interactive maps into my daily update blog posts.  Starting with our first day riding from Whitehaven to Keswick, you can now explore the map of our route on each of the 11 days.  Feel free to zoom in, pan around, and change the map underlay as much as you want.

Jul 212010
 

While I was in the UK the power must have cut out for a while at home.  As well as causing oven timers to beep in protest, this black-out stopped my webserver.  Frustratingly, a hard drive check warning prevented the server from rebooting normally, and so this website has been down for the last week or so.

But I am now home, and this server is buzzing along happily again on top of the filing cabinet.  It’s good to be home.

Jul 132010
 

Our ride covered a total of 576.84 km in 11 days, and the adventure was wonderful.  The wet final day made us glad to reach Edinburgh, but it was almost a shame the next morning to leave our trikes chained up.

We have so many delightful memories from our cycle tour of Cumbria, Northumberland, and the Scottish Borders.  Some of them are a bit mixed up and blurred together, and we’ll need to organise photos and video to put them back in sequence in our minds.  Although muscles are sore and tired after all the pedalling, we are convinced that another cycle tour should happen.  

But not just yet. Instead of loading our panniers and riding on, we caught a bus into the city and visited Edinburgh Castle.  It is a great building on a perfect location and it has fascinating history, but we were overwhelmed by all the people.  A week and a half of riding through small villages and minor roads must have recalibrated our tolerance of tourist crowds.

It was nice to spend a second night in the same place after being constantly on the move.  Today we picked up a hire car and drove back to the Lake District in about 3 hours.  Covering the distance so quickly was actually a bit disorienting, but Lake Windermere is beautiful.  The foreshore at Bowness became peaceful after the tourists left in the evening, and was full of photo opportunities as the sun set.

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Jul 102010
 

As we draw near to the end of our cycle tour, it feels similar to where we started.  Today was our second day riding inland along the Tweed River, and we have returned to mountain scenery. It looks similar to the Lake District, and especially so today because it has been raining.

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Jul 092010
 

Nine continuous days of riding have finally brought us into Scotland. We crossed the border a few times today as we wound inland roughly along the Tweed River.  This delightful and quite rural region is still called the Scottish Borders or sometimes the “debatable lands”.

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Jul 072010
 

Today we achieved our highest average riding speed so far. This is becoming important because of the increasing density of interesting things to see along the Coast & Castles route. In one day we have pedalled past three castles, some old manor houses and a Pele tower.

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